A Poem by Eric Tran

Eric Tran

Eric Tran

Eric Tran is a medical student at the University of North Carolina and holds an MFA from UNCW. He is the winner of the 2015 New Delta Review Matt Clark Prose Award and was a finalist in the 2015 Indiana Review 1/2K Prize and the Tinderbox Poetry Prize. His work appears in or is forthcoming in Best of the Net 2015, DIAGRAM, Indiana Review, Black Warrior Review, and elsewhere.

Untitled (Portrait of Ross in L.A.)

Because lately all joints seem rustle twist; rising from reclining hospital beds, from cabs and laps, some human part spills off the edges. On the worst days, the body anagrams spleen and sulcus, shine and surface. On the worst days, the body props and leans in those final selfies. Those days, the world swarms with hands—clumsy, numbed grasping for blood and breath and breast. And really no God-blessed matter can be touched and remain. No fire, no burnished doorknob. No senile woman whose head I hold still for central line placement. Not her heart’s pace when we move too slow. Not her ribs snapped clean in CPR. Not your hand or mine, enclosed as the cover of a book.  But if my body was dust, was subway stubs and footprints and we piled it up, would we call it healed? New or novel? I’m asking you to take your palms and push—tonight, make me full again. 

Alternatives to Saying It

Sounds like bay door yawning open, bottle cap popped with iron rail. Sorry, sounds not like cancer. Nothing like sorry. Like hard-packed rubber, like bounce off plywood base. Knurled steel spinning—oh whistle and catch, gasp and glottal stop. Catgut kissed felted air, fat smoked across coal. River dive: crack like virgin femur, like unleavened bread. Mower blade spinning rocks, mouthful of fork and china.  OK so velvet brushed napped and flat, but too no Velcro pulling free, no hooks from lines of eye. Three phone rings and answer or shrill to voicemail. Streetlight flicker: off and on, off and on, off and